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@Instagram ‘Logout against #SPAM – Day One…

15 Apr

And so I tweeted… (right after posting a picture of my #Whereabouts, that last #Breadcrumb… well… that…)

Kankuchito: it’s gonna hurt ME more, BUT… #Slacktivism, here we go! (…is #Ballmer tuned in, tho’?)…  and… http://t.co/tkba9mfDBU

So yes, it’s hurtineg ME more… and ‘The Decision Makers’, tho’?

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Abstinence?

and later, on @Tumblr…

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Cornfield? that's so vague1

End of Days? My Personal #DailyJournal is out again!

10 Jan

OJ Label? Eat ur heart out!

“Put together with concentrates from @ESPN, @FJPalacio, those tweeting last night about #BAMA, #SEC #BCSChampionship and various other sources…”

[CUT TO NEWS SEGMENTS ABOUT #SOPA-POCALYPSE]

“… And in other news, recent shutdowns from major sites prompted many to believe that the world had ended when they were unable to poke, like, comment or tweet their #Tweeps…”

[CUT TO MAYHEM SHOTS… PEOPLES RUNNIN’N’SCREAMIN:]

“My #Facebook! I can’t change my cover photo three times today! Nooooo!”

[BACK TO NEWS DESK]

And others thought the world had also ended as their devices stopped talking back at them, causing a surge of hysteria!

[IMAGINES ORSON WELLES SCARIN’ THE BEEJEZUS OUT OF SOME FOLKS BACK IN THEM AM RADIO DAYS…]

[SATISFIED SMILE!]

There! And I did not even have to talk about the weather!

[LOGSON TO 25-INCHER COMMAND POST… ADDS TWEETS-AS-COMMENTS… TICKLES SEARCH ENGINES…]

#MMS: Market & Audience Rationales: “Behind The Scenes With Newspaper Journalists”

28 Jan
(Posted on Facebook by Spero Canton on Friday, October 23, 2009 at 10:16am)

This is a synopsis of a 66 page report which can be found at: http://www.mediamanagementcenter.org/research/lifebeyondprint.asp

According to a new report: “Life beyond print: Newspaper journalists’ digital appetite” by the Media Management Center, Northwestern University, almost half of today’s newspaper journalists think their newsroom’s transition from print to digital is moving too slowly, as they have no trouble envisioning a career where news is delivered primarily online and to mobile devices instead of in print.
MMC executive director Michael P. Smith, says “For several years we have heard that it is the journalists’ resistance to change that was holding newspapers back… this study shows that they are ready, and some are even impatient, for change.”
Now it appears that America’s journalists want a quicker transformation from print to digital delivery of the news, a study of almost 3,800 people in a cross-section of newspaper newsrooms shows. Many of these journalists are heavily engaged in digital activities in their personal lives and would like to devote more effort to digital products at work. But most of their time in the newsroom is still spent on print responsibilities. Only 20% of the workforce like things the way they are or yearn for the good old days.
Life Beyond Print, a study by Vickey Williams, Stacy Lynch and Bob LeBailly, assembles profiles of six types of journalists inhabiting the typical newspaper newsroom in 2009. They range from the “Digitals” (12% of the workforce) who spend a majority of their efforts online today, to the “Turn Back the Clock” contingent (6%), who long for the day when print was king.
Fully half of newsroom workers wish to do “Moderately More” online, arriving at something closer to an equal split with their print efforts, requiring a doubling of the effort they spend today. Those in the “Major Shift” profile (11%) would devote five times their current effort to online if given their druthers.
Newspaper journalists still love their jobs: Despite industry turmoil:
• 77% of journalists are somewhat or very satisfied with their current jobs
• 67% think it somewhat or very likely they will be in the news business two years from now
• 59% think they’ll likely be with their same newspaper
Online desire in the newsroom is not determined by age, years of journalism experience, or proximity to retirement. And youth is not a factor in predicting who in the newsroom wants to move into digital. Rather, the top two predictors of digital appetite are heavy Internet use outside work and having knowledge of online audiences and their preferences.
Previous Readership Institute research has proven the importance of customer knowledge as a first step in building media use, says the report. Real customer focus also includes acting on the results and letting customer needs drive internal decision-making. This study offers a new reason why knowing the audience is important… it helps stimulate a desire to transition to online work. Other predictors of digital appetite include:
• Openness to change at work and adaptability
• Proactive pursuit of the training necessary to learn online skills
• Keeping up with companywide initiatives and industry developments
The study creates these profiles of journalists:
Digitals, about 12% of the workforce, spend most of their time working online. They’re the youngest group, with an average age of 38, and 59% believe the digital transformation is taking too long in their newsroom. They follow big-picture trends, want to quicken the pace These journalists are most likely to be online editors or producers, but about 17% are reporters or writers. Overall, they’re newer to journalism than any other group.
Digitals score highly on factors that relate to adaptability – such as openness to change and work and career proactivity. They’re similar to leaders in this and many other respects. They’re most apt to describe themselves as the first to try something new at work and as having career options.
In a key finding, digital employees label themselves markedly more knowledgeable about consumers of digital, and at the same level of print reader knowledge as their print counterparts. Overall they are much more aware of customer behaviors and needs.
Other findings:
• More than half of the Digitals have undergraduate or graduate degrees in journalism
• 23% have no post-secondary journalism training
• 42% have been in the news business less than 10 years
• 11% have been journalists for more than 30 years
• The average age is the youngest for any segment
Major Shift, at 11%, are the most dissatisfied with their current state, more pessimistic about staying in the business long-term and want the most pronounced change. This group – roughly an equal mix of reporters, mid-level editors, copy editors, designers and videographers, most of whom have been in the business at least 15 years – would like to devote five times their current effort to online. They’re deeply engaged online in their personal lives, but see a disconnect at work. They could help the newsroom adapt faster, but need a sign they should stay in newspapers.
Moderately More, the largest segment at 50% and encompassing many reporters and mid-level editors, want a roughly equal split between online and print work. Half the newsroom believes their newsroom transition has been too slow and would be comfortable seeing their job duties shift moderately more online. But by nearly a 2-1 margin, they believe the newsroom is headed in the right direction.
Some of the Moderately More defining characteristics include:
• Their ideal job would be divided about 50-50 between print and online effort, requiring a doubling of their digital effort today.
• They tend to have been in the business more than 20 years
• 43% are reporters and another 22% are mid-level editors
• They would hire more reporters and editors, improve print content and improve the Web site design, in that order.
The Status Quo segment, at 14%, believe the 30% of effort they currently devote to online is sufficient and expect little disruption to the way they work now. In newsrooms where improving digital performance is a top strategic priority, this group will need a wake-up call. These journalists believe the evolution of newspapers has gone far enough. Just less than a third of their current effort centers online and they would prefer to see no change.
Most of the Status Quos believe the pace of change to date has been “about right,” whether in respect to their own job or newsroom-wide change. They forecast more moderate or minimal changes to come than the rest of the newsroom. This group is slightly older than the overall population. Nearly half are age 50 or older and 1-in-10 is 60 or older.
If put in command, they would:
• First hire more reporters and editors
• Invest in improving print content
• Support online investment, but third after print improvements and increasing manpower
Turn Back the Clock segment represents 6% of journalists who wish it would all go away. This part of the staff would go more heavily into print if they could. They report about 30% of their current effort is spent online, nearly triple the amount they would prefer. This is a group that has tested the online environment and they don’t like it.
This group weighs toward reporters and photographers and they closely mirror the newsroom average for age and years until retirement. What particularly sets them apart from others is their low levels of adaptability. Asked to rate themselves on openness to change, how they approach change at work, and career resilience, they rated significantly lower than other print employees and dramatically lower than digital employees or senior managers.
Individuals in this group report being less satisfied than their Status Quo colleagues. They also have the lowest opinion of leaders of all the groups and are least likely, in particular, to believe executives really understand what it takes to put out the newspaper.
Leaders, at 5%, are publishers, editors and managing editors, most of whom have been in the news business more than 20 years. Most report their roles are primarily print-focused but want to shift to online. Like Digitals, they describe themselves as open to change and optimistic about their career options.
• Publishers, editors and managing editors indicate they are spending about a quarter of their work effort on online matters, but believe the emphasis should shift to favor digital (53%) over print responsibilities
• 28% of leaders think their job is changing too fast overall, which could reflect the lack of clarity around a business model to sustain digitally delivered journalism.
• Leaders tend to be more than a decade older (49), and 77% have been in the news business more than 20 years, including 42% for more than 30 years.
• Leaders are more confident in the overall direction of the newsroom, with nearly 70% saying the newsroom is on the right track, as compared to about 45% of Digitals.
• This group reports somewhat greater Internet use outside work than other journalists. On the job, they use the Internet as a reporting or editing tool, but likely not for much else. Given their druthers, they would post more, plan more and link more online.
The study concludes with challenge the leaders face:
• Journalists’ passion for the mission is there, but they need basic tools for reinvention and more engaged leadership. More than half of the journalists working primarily in print had no training in the previous year to equip them for a digital transition. One in four journalists reports having had no training at all
• There are major gaps between how leaders think they are doing and how staff view them, in such areas as fostering collaboration, seeking out input from employees at all levels, and communicating strategy in a way that relates to employees’ jobs
In addition, there are differing expectations for leaders among the segments:
• Digitals want leaders to be even more immersed in online trends and to sharpen the digital vision
• Major Shifts want more risk-taking
• Status Quos generally like what leaders are doing and advocate staying the course.

Source/Credits/More: : http://www.mediamanagementcenter.org/research/lifebeyondprint.asp

Constructively Speaking… a nice thread on Social Media Certifications (via @UnMarketing)

8 Dec

Apropos this tweet…

#Corrected: @unmarketing “… Future of Social Media Certifications” @TheBrandBuilder http://bit.ly/7iztwX #MustRead anyways #FaveTopic ^SM 26 minutes ago from UberTwitter

I jumped into the thread comment to vent out a couple of thoughts…

Stalling at the Gate?

Stalling at the Gate?

Here..

(Thanks to Scott for Tweeting about this… even if it was about a typo!… seems like a Pow-Wow by now!)

If I may?

One, I took the time (and even took out a Student Loan) to get my MCP/MCSA certifications… and spend a year at New Horizons, learning HALF of what I did not know (which we usually DON’T KNOW, right?) about the whole Microsoft environment… got a few sneers from some peers, but I’m sure that the GE HR DB also got enough hits out of my resume to help me land my last job… are they valuable? I don’t think that’s in doubt, but I just wanted to remind myself (and whoever read this) that along with Microsoft’s, a peek at the Test Taking site (Thompson-Prometric) allowed one to see that a whole industry was sitting on those servers…

Two, as to certifying bodies and standards: I am a certified PADI Divemaster… why? ‘cuz I follow the PADI standards… and again, SAME scenarios (of plain subjectivity, a human frailty we all seem to be afflicted with – and which also allows for varied offerings to compete in an open market, as Ruth pointed out earlier) where we’d have “pissing contests” between the old salts who thought that PADI was ‘bad’ because of a few feet, a few atmospheres, and whatever other differences they could find, just to validate that ‘theirs’ (meaning such other bodies like NAUI, SSI, etc) was ‘better’…

This being a blog about brands, I can easily foresee a combination of what y’all are talking about, and a future mature industry where different ‘venues’ are offered, as in the end, just as I mentioned earlier, these kind of discussions are sure to ‘chum up the waters’ and bring in the apex predators… the ones with the cash and the stamina to aggregate and catalyze these divergent dialectics into a marketable product that allows, much like y’all have posted, for individuals to “highlight” their abilities (not that they prove anything, yes, as I’ve also seen ‘certified’ IT pros whose personal proclivities left for a lot of room for doubt as to their professionalism) and for companies to ‘segregate’ those whose desire for continuing education (that old process of learning AND unlearning that keeps some of us afloat in these raging labor markets) at least validates their desire to find a way to make it, whether by mere training attendance, or by coagulating what they ‘knew’ from first hand experience, into yet another piece of paper on the proverbial bragger wall.

Greed and other base values will take care of the rest, as this nascent industry matures and gains the recognition it deserves from those we so desperately try to evangelize as to its existence.

A Lifelong Learner – and Unlearner

#InCaseYouMissedIt #ReadingList: The Art Of Speed Reading People (Barron-Tieger, 1998)

8 Dec

From a GREAT book on People… “The Art of Speed Reading People”… Found these excerpts online at ENotAlone.Com

“Before you begin an introduction to Personality Type, it might be helpful for you to know a bit about its history. The basic ideas behind Type are not new. In fact, they were first written about by Swiss psychologist Carl Jung more than seventy years ago.

But it was two American women, Katharine Briggs and her daughter, Isabel Myers, who were really responsible for building on, including developing the fourth type dimension, and making these ideas useful in practical ways to so many people.

One of Isabel’s major contributions to our understanding of human behavior was the development of a psychological instrument that reliably identifies sixteen distinctly different types.

She named this the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)®, and over the past several years, millions of people around the world have been introduced to the benefits of knowing about Personality Type through the MBTI®, It is routinely used in business to help managers motivate employees, develop more-productive work teams, and enhance communication.

It is also heavily used by counselors and therapists to help individuals, couples, and families understand and communicate better with each other.

Hundreds of thousands of people have found Personality Type invaluable in helping them make satisfying career choices. And these are only some of its many applications” (Barron-Tieger, 1998)

  • (and funny enough, look what I found to illustrate? the one and only @ChrisBrogan!)

William Safire, RIP, 1929-2009

28 Sep
  • “Knowing how things work is the basis for appreciation, and is thus a source of civilized delight.”
  • “Saber cómo funcionan las cosas es la base para la apreciación, y es por tanto una fuente de placer civilizado.”
  • “Zu wissen, wie die Dinge funktionieren ist die Basis für Wertschätzung, und ist somit eine Quelle der zivilisierten Freude.”
William Safires Dictionary of Politics

William Safire's Dictionary of Politics

RT @FJPalacio “I think we all have a need to know what we do not need to know.” Apropos William Safire, RIP, 1929-2009 #Quote http://bit.ly/1FcWgz

Some videos from YouTube:

William Safire http://bit.ly/xgEFC

Bill Safire: “It Was My Kitchen…” http://bit.ly/16QCdM

William Safire Memorial Speech http://bit.ly/15XSUx

“Democrats vs. Republicans”:William Safire and Ted Sorenson http://bit.ly/gkd0d

“Youth Involvement”: William Safire and Ted Sorenson http://bit.ly/1Gb8Xd