Tag Archives: Bloggers

#J18 Aftermath/Takeaways? #FB Friend asked: “What [CENSORED] to your [CENSORED]?… a #SOPAJoke? it ain’t so! :P

19 Jan

Following is an exchange with a dear #FB Friend (and also in real life… haven’t you seen the pics?… it’s all out there, too!) who asked about mid-morning YESTERDAY (#j18) about my Profile Pic/Cover Photos having been removed from #Facebook… so I said, PRIVATELY, as to comply with the protest’s guidelines…

[CONSPIRATORIAL WHISPER!]

NOT seen it on the news?… do you ever use WikiPedia?…

… it’s a ‘protest’… we’re supposed to be q u i e t today*… something about censoring the web…

... who'd have thought that Weaving & Portman would end up re-viving such an interesing icon... and was it The Wachowskis that sent out the "update'" to the universe, too?... now being 'leveraged' by  #J18 #Occupy, etc...

... who'd have thought that Weaving & Portman would end up re-viving such an interesing icon... and was it The Wachowskis that sent out the "update'" to the universe, too?... now being 'leveraged' by #J18 #Occupy, etc...

Wanna know more?

Try Google-ing (they said they’d also participate!) “#SOPA” and you’ll get some info.

Me? I’m letting the political pundit & activist come out after #31YrsInTheMaking, so yeah, this is my first “cause” that I’m supporting; not that I don’t care about Intellectual Property Rights, BUT I don’t know if you’ve ever messed around with what are called “DNS” servers… NOT the best way to enforce it, NO!

“When The Legislature is in Session, NO one’s Life, Liberty or Property is SAFE”…

#JeJeJe!

Pancho

P.S: Do u ever watch CNN?… may want to start here, too!

… dunno if it’s your cuppatea politically, we never got to talk about it, but anyway, that’s why today? I’m on ‘stealth’ mode…

Saludos a [CENSORED], while we’re at it… of everyone down there, [CENSORED]… Hasta pronto!”

[T2H: “Think it’s a #SOPAjoke? Don’t think so!… Better a #TweetLine for the Post!”]

*So THAT was the original exchange… today? I am leveraging all my Schedulin’ #ToolPlay to get LOUD tomorrow (when I’m actually going to take a break from all this redirecting… #PunIntended!)

C-ya!

End of Days? My Personal #DailyJournal is out again!

10 Jan

OJ Label? Eat ur heart out!

“Put together with concentrates from @ESPN, @FJPalacio, those tweeting last night about #BAMA, #SEC #BCSChampionship and various other sources…”

[CUT TO NEWS SEGMENTS ABOUT #SOPA-POCALYPSE]

“… And in other news, recent shutdowns from major sites prompted many to believe that the world had ended when they were unable to poke, like, comment or tweet their #Tweeps…”

[CUT TO MAYHEM SHOTS… PEOPLES RUNNIN’N’SCREAMIN:]

“My #Facebook! I can’t change my cover photo three times today! Nooooo!”

[BACK TO NEWS DESK]

And others thought the world had also ended as their devices stopped talking back at them, causing a surge of hysteria!

[IMAGINES ORSON WELLES SCARIN’ THE BEEJEZUS OUT OF SOME FOLKS BACK IN THEM AM RADIO DAYS…]

[SATISFIED SMILE!]

There! And I did not even have to talk about the weather!

[LOGSON TO 25-INCHER COMMAND POST… ADDS TWEETS-AS-COMMENTS… TICKLES SEARCH ENGINES…]

There’s a First Time for Everything! #AudioPost via @WordPress.Com… yay!

4 Jan

Hehehe!… and here’s me thinkin’ about resuscitating the #Cinch account… buyout? reverse engineering? feat’s here, fo’ sho!… so here’s the first one, and with Unlimited Vonage and a handful of minutes on the Cell… well!… Heeeellooooo Woooorld!

#InCaseYouMissedIt: #SeenOnAWallNearYou – A #Comment on #Privacy – and those Apps’s T.O.S’s

28 Feb

@ NP-B

Is this about the privacy thing?

[WRY CHUCKLE]

Again… want privacy? Step away from the Keyboard. (SM)

[SIGHS]

… and no, I don’t use any of these apps; I use those who are a tad bit more ‘creative’ – yet, I’m pretty sure, if I took the time to read the T.O.S., it’s all pretty much a bunch of legalese saying “you opted in, you’re ours” – which is what I gather from above.

The price of Freeware, perhaps? I’m glad to pay for it; it’s quid-pro-quo: I get a free app, they get to know about me – or at least what I’ve decided to post it’s ‘me’ (meaning, we still control the conversation, Facebook’s pestering for ‘additional profile information’ notwithstanding)

… now… would there ever be real ‘privacy’ on the Web?

Maybe if you’re a real large organization, whose resources – and compliance factors – allow it and require it? a shred of it; yet again, it’s privacy TILTED for the sake of the organization’s goals and needs  – NEVER the users.

So what do I do?

“write as though anything online may end up on the front page of The New York Times” (G.E. HR Orientation Video, 2005)

Otherwise?

Keep your noses clean – and read up what Nancy posts!

[CHUCKLES]

#Justsayin!

#Facebook Talks: A Thought on #Social/#New #Media – And #Graduating in 2010 (#MMS)

27 Feb

Someone just recently asked me about LinkedIN and their graduation; a conversation ensued in FB Mail, so I took this looooong answer and created a blog post; also helps me showcase the rationales to a few other friends who think the water it’s too cold, deep, or otherwise murky to ‘dive in’…

[SPLASHES INTO A CANNONBALL!]

@ [OLD FBF!]

“Love reading the stuff you post!” (OLD FBF, 2010)

[SIDE SMILE… PUZZLED LOOK]

Really? then I’d make you my ONE reader!

[CHUCKLES… GUFFAWS]

Seriously; it’s sometimes a weird feeling when the ‘interacting’ stops, I know it was more profuse in the past because of specifics such as the election, the length of this recession (which by now has all worn us down to a nub!) and other topics.

Now I think most of the talk happens in FarmVille land, and that little time is available to talk; also, content has exponentially been ‘induced’ into Facebook, so the amounts are just overwhelming…

… and for someone about to graduate, I think time for you is like the most precious commodity, ain’t it?

[SNICKERS… SIGHS…]

Anyway… yeah, y’all 2010 Grads will be facing a HISTORICALLY sucky market; the good news?

Y’all are also the MOST talented ‘generation’ of grads to come out; many ascribe it to the fact that you’re ‘digitally enabled’

IMHO?

Just got a note from a Toastmasters in Dubai.

Go Global.
Expose Yourself
Curate these Sites as though your life depended on IT!
LinkedIN? PAY for the upgrade, and make it a point of getting PAST those 500+ connections in a minute; there, it’s obvious why you’re asking, so be courteous, yet assertive
Here? Create a Professional FB ‘Fan’ Page; make it ‘sound’ like your LinkedIN Profile (100% Business)
Use Networked Blogs to add some cool RSS’ing to it; creates a REASON to fan it; and for some of us, a reason to @Mention, Share and interact with YOUR Fan Page here in FB
…. and last but NOT least?

Dude… get on TWITTER!!!!

ASAP!

That’s where a LOT of people are getting their “Ticker Tape” fix… remember Homer Adams watching it intently?

That’s my best analogy for it; it’s fresh, breaking, and above all, relevant information.

Me?

Check out the info tab, there’s a handful of ID’s, pick at least:

@MMSocieties
@FJPalacio

The others are ‘convo’ -specific (i.e. Oralisimo = #LATISM; Papparazzos = #TOGS, etc)

AND LEARN THE LINGO!

Want more?

Sign up for our Meetup.Com place, I post all the vids, and most relevant of all, that’s the only place to get our ‘Slides’.

http://MediaMentoring.Net.

Okidoki, hope this helps – and answers! some more questions, Mr. Graduate

F.

P.S: Coffee? SURE!… the whole point of FBF’s is that eventually we DO get to meet them FTF!…

[CACKLES!]

O Tempora, O Mores!

Ci vedeamo!

[HUMS HAPPILY… THINKS TO HIMSELF: “I have a reader! at least ONE reader out there!… yay!”]

(;OD)~

#InCaseYouMissedIt: @DowntownGarden’s “What’s up With Social Media” Series: Session Three: Facebook Basics

29 Jan

… Hello Media Mentors, Examiner.Com readers!

We were able to broadcast live last evening using UStream:

That said, here we go!

**** Ustream “Show”:

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/mediamentoringsociety

**** Slide Deck/Pitch for SECOND Hour tonight (THREE (3) topics ONLY will be chosen by attendees from this lecture at PBSC)

http://www.slideshare.net/secret/eeuxUHkevxuTEe

**** Slide Deck/Pitch we repeat every session, as it contains a useful overview of WHY/WHAT FOR we do Social/New Media at all…

http://www.slideshare.net/secret/2UOyUDCiXWf4GP

See you soon… FTF or here, via CMAC!

Saludos!
Stay tuned!
Francisco Palacio
@MMSocieties
Francisco.J.Palacio@MediaMentoring.Org
http://MediaMentoring.Net
http://CMAC-Labs.US


  • First Hour of the Session, Broadcast LIVE On @UStream and archived there as well…

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/4094879

  • Second Hour of the Session, Broadcast LIVE On @UStream and archived there as well…

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/4095963


And here we have the video archives from the prior one, on Tuesday 2010 01 12 so that anyone can catch up… want them all? visit us at MediaMentoring.Net for all the proceedings so far – and to stay updated


Hello everyone!

Also: here’s the audio from 2010 01 12’s Session (number two: on Wikis and Communities)

http://sn.im/u437h

http://sn.im/u437n

as well as the video from that same night (Session #2)

http://vimeo.com/8742121

http://vimeo.com/8740625

And the slide deck/pitch (remember, the overview is the same for all sessions; we will only spend a few minutes on it this third time, as we open up the floor to CHOOSE which topics we will be working on that night’s second hour!)

http://www.slideshare.net/secret/1ptXKoqIqkNCU0

Also, here’s something I wrote on the Event page, as to encourage everyone to bring their tools so we can work together and get somethings done every night you attend:

“We would encourage everyone with a Laptop, Notebook, iPhone or Blackberry to come prepared with these tools as this third session will be the most interactive of all so far, given the feedback we’ve received, we’ll not only be sharing the overview, but also the lecture portion of the class to be given at PBSC soon; however, we’d ask the attendees to pick THREE topics of their choice, so that we can focus the second hour on a sample lab situation…

Webcams, Audio Recorders, Video Recorders and other gear, we also hope you can bring those from now on, as to allow YOUR participation to become part of the interaction!…

Stay tuned also as we give out locations to the LIVE UStream and LIVE CinchCast Broadcasts for this evening, so that you can tune in in case you cannot attend personally – or share with your friends, as to allow them to see you AT WORK with these magnificent tools!….”

So for example, check out what we did together on Friday!


http://sn.im/u4383
or
http://www.facebook.com/video/?oid=269534585125
or
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/testing-webcam1


#MMS: Market & Audience Rationales: “Behind The Scenes With Newspaper Journalists”

28 Jan
(Posted on Facebook by Spero Canton on Friday, October 23, 2009 at 10:16am)

This is a synopsis of a 66 page report which can be found at: http://www.mediamanagementcenter.org/research/lifebeyondprint.asp

According to a new report: “Life beyond print: Newspaper journalists’ digital appetite” by the Media Management Center, Northwestern University, almost half of today’s newspaper journalists think their newsroom’s transition from print to digital is moving too slowly, as they have no trouble envisioning a career where news is delivered primarily online and to mobile devices instead of in print.
MMC executive director Michael P. Smith, says “For several years we have heard that it is the journalists’ resistance to change that was holding newspapers back… this study shows that they are ready, and some are even impatient, for change.”
Now it appears that America’s journalists want a quicker transformation from print to digital delivery of the news, a study of almost 3,800 people in a cross-section of newspaper newsrooms shows. Many of these journalists are heavily engaged in digital activities in their personal lives and would like to devote more effort to digital products at work. But most of their time in the newsroom is still spent on print responsibilities. Only 20% of the workforce like things the way they are or yearn for the good old days.
Life Beyond Print, a study by Vickey Williams, Stacy Lynch and Bob LeBailly, assembles profiles of six types of journalists inhabiting the typical newspaper newsroom in 2009. They range from the “Digitals” (12% of the workforce) who spend a majority of their efforts online today, to the “Turn Back the Clock” contingent (6%), who long for the day when print was king.
Fully half of newsroom workers wish to do “Moderately More” online, arriving at something closer to an equal split with their print efforts, requiring a doubling of the effort they spend today. Those in the “Major Shift” profile (11%) would devote five times their current effort to online if given their druthers.
Newspaper journalists still love their jobs: Despite industry turmoil:
• 77% of journalists are somewhat or very satisfied with their current jobs
• 67% think it somewhat or very likely they will be in the news business two years from now
• 59% think they’ll likely be with their same newspaper
Online desire in the newsroom is not determined by age, years of journalism experience, or proximity to retirement. And youth is not a factor in predicting who in the newsroom wants to move into digital. Rather, the top two predictors of digital appetite are heavy Internet use outside work and having knowledge of online audiences and their preferences.
Previous Readership Institute research has proven the importance of customer knowledge as a first step in building media use, says the report. Real customer focus also includes acting on the results and letting customer needs drive internal decision-making. This study offers a new reason why knowing the audience is important… it helps stimulate a desire to transition to online work. Other predictors of digital appetite include:
• Openness to change at work and adaptability
• Proactive pursuit of the training necessary to learn online skills
• Keeping up with companywide initiatives and industry developments
The study creates these profiles of journalists:
Digitals, about 12% of the workforce, spend most of their time working online. They’re the youngest group, with an average age of 38, and 59% believe the digital transformation is taking too long in their newsroom. They follow big-picture trends, want to quicken the pace These journalists are most likely to be online editors or producers, but about 17% are reporters or writers. Overall, they’re newer to journalism than any other group.
Digitals score highly on factors that relate to adaptability – such as openness to change and work and career proactivity. They’re similar to leaders in this and many other respects. They’re most apt to describe themselves as the first to try something new at work and as having career options.
In a key finding, digital employees label themselves markedly more knowledgeable about consumers of digital, and at the same level of print reader knowledge as their print counterparts. Overall they are much more aware of customer behaviors and needs.
Other findings:
• More than half of the Digitals have undergraduate or graduate degrees in journalism
• 23% have no post-secondary journalism training
• 42% have been in the news business less than 10 years
• 11% have been journalists for more than 30 years
• The average age is the youngest for any segment
Major Shift, at 11%, are the most dissatisfied with their current state, more pessimistic about staying in the business long-term and want the most pronounced change. This group – roughly an equal mix of reporters, mid-level editors, copy editors, designers and videographers, most of whom have been in the business at least 15 years – would like to devote five times their current effort to online. They’re deeply engaged online in their personal lives, but see a disconnect at work. They could help the newsroom adapt faster, but need a sign they should stay in newspapers.
Moderately More, the largest segment at 50% and encompassing many reporters and mid-level editors, want a roughly equal split between online and print work. Half the newsroom believes their newsroom transition has been too slow and would be comfortable seeing their job duties shift moderately more online. But by nearly a 2-1 margin, they believe the newsroom is headed in the right direction.
Some of the Moderately More defining characteristics include:
• Their ideal job would be divided about 50-50 between print and online effort, requiring a doubling of their digital effort today.
• They tend to have been in the business more than 20 years
• 43% are reporters and another 22% are mid-level editors
• They would hire more reporters and editors, improve print content and improve the Web site design, in that order.
The Status Quo segment, at 14%, believe the 30% of effort they currently devote to online is sufficient and expect little disruption to the way they work now. In newsrooms where improving digital performance is a top strategic priority, this group will need a wake-up call. These journalists believe the evolution of newspapers has gone far enough. Just less than a third of their current effort centers online and they would prefer to see no change.
Most of the Status Quos believe the pace of change to date has been “about right,” whether in respect to their own job or newsroom-wide change. They forecast more moderate or minimal changes to come than the rest of the newsroom. This group is slightly older than the overall population. Nearly half are age 50 or older and 1-in-10 is 60 or older.
If put in command, they would:
• First hire more reporters and editors
• Invest in improving print content
• Support online investment, but third after print improvements and increasing manpower
Turn Back the Clock segment represents 6% of journalists who wish it would all go away. This part of the staff would go more heavily into print if they could. They report about 30% of their current effort is spent online, nearly triple the amount they would prefer. This is a group that has tested the online environment and they don’t like it.
This group weighs toward reporters and photographers and they closely mirror the newsroom average for age and years until retirement. What particularly sets them apart from others is their low levels of adaptability. Asked to rate themselves on openness to change, how they approach change at work, and career resilience, they rated significantly lower than other print employees and dramatically lower than digital employees or senior managers.
Individuals in this group report being less satisfied than their Status Quo colleagues. They also have the lowest opinion of leaders of all the groups and are least likely, in particular, to believe executives really understand what it takes to put out the newspaper.
Leaders, at 5%, are publishers, editors and managing editors, most of whom have been in the news business more than 20 years. Most report their roles are primarily print-focused but want to shift to online. Like Digitals, they describe themselves as open to change and optimistic about their career options.
• Publishers, editors and managing editors indicate they are spending about a quarter of their work effort on online matters, but believe the emphasis should shift to favor digital (53%) over print responsibilities
• 28% of leaders think their job is changing too fast overall, which could reflect the lack of clarity around a business model to sustain digitally delivered journalism.
• Leaders tend to be more than a decade older (49), and 77% have been in the news business more than 20 years, including 42% for more than 30 years.
• Leaders are more confident in the overall direction of the newsroom, with nearly 70% saying the newsroom is on the right track, as compared to about 45% of Digitals.
• This group reports somewhat greater Internet use outside work than other journalists. On the job, they use the Internet as a reporting or editing tool, but likely not for much else. Given their druthers, they would post more, plan more and link more online.
The study concludes with challenge the leaders face:
• Journalists’ passion for the mission is there, but they need basic tools for reinvention and more engaged leadership. More than half of the journalists working primarily in print had no training in the previous year to equip them for a digital transition. One in four journalists reports having had no training at all
• There are major gaps between how leaders think they are doing and how staff view them, in such areas as fostering collaboration, seeking out input from employees at all levels, and communicating strategy in a way that relates to employees’ jobs
In addition, there are differing expectations for leaders among the segments:
• Digitals want leaders to be even more immersed in online trends and to sharpen the digital vision
• Major Shifts want more risk-taking
• Status Quos generally like what leaders are doing and advocate staying the course.

Source/Credits/More: : http://www.mediamanagementcenter.org/research/lifebeyondprint.asp